A wonderful life

Wonderful a life. Mac-Intosh is no doubt a man of a very clear understanding, of an imposing elocution, a very able disputant, and a very metaphysical lawyer, but by no means a profound metaphysician, not quite a Berkeley in subtlety of distinction. Whatever pleases, whatever strikes, holds out a temptation to the French artist too strong to be resisted, and there is too great a sympathy in the public mind with this view of the subject, to quarrel with or severely criticise what is so congenial with its own feelings. When they assume upon us, or set themselves before us, their self-estimation mortifies our own. And a critic would not use so careless a phrase as “Tasso’s masterpiece.” The essay on Congreve does not add much to our understanding: And so he set upon the boards a set of men and women of quick brains and cynical humours, who talked with the brilliance and rapidity wherewith the finished swordsman fences. It was not easy always to say whether he was in jest or earnest—but he contrived to hitch his extravagances into the midst of some grave debate; the House had their laugh for nothing; the question got into shape again, and Mr. Why should a library allow young people to dance, or men to hold a political meeting or the neighbors to exhibit local products, in its building? Its dialogue at its best has, along with its coarseness, an unmistakable brilliance of wit. These three different things constitute the whole nature and circumstances of the action, and must be the foundation of whatever quality can belong to it. And Dante helps us to provide a criticism of M. Libraries that are in constant trouble with their readers–the object of continual complaint and controversy, generally have the feeling that the fault is with the public. In a person who is either much depressed by grief or enlivened by joy, who is strongly affected either with love or hatred, with gratitude or resentment, with admiration or contempt, there is commonly one thought or idea which dwells upon his mind, which continually haunts him, which, when he has chased it away, immediately returns upon him, and which in company makes him absent and inattentive. The less credulous we are of other things, the more faith we shall have in reserve for them: by exhausting our stock of scepticism and caution on such obvious matters of fact as that people always see with their eyes open, we shall be prepared to swallow their crude and extravagant theories whole, and not be astonished at ‘the phenomenon, that persons sometimes reason better asleep than awake!’ I have alluded to this passage because I myself am (or used some time ago to be) a sleep-walker; and know how the thing is. Such was the system of Tycho Brahe, compounded, as is evident, out of these of Ptolemy and Copernicus; happier than that of Ptolemy, in the account which it gives of the motions of the two inferior Planets; more complex, by supposing the different revolutions of all the Five to be performed round two different centres; the diurnal round the Earth, the periodical round the Sun, but, in every respect, more complex and more incoherent than that of Copernicus. The librarian then pursues whatever course seems good to him. He will find one into which the garden of Epicurus may be said to open, where he can gather about him, at any rate, the congenial friends who are always ready to hold sweet discourse with him through their books; patient friends whom he cannot offend by an {408} unwise interruption, though unhappily they are out of reach of the gratitude which he would fain tender them. The medi?val writers of the laughable story in verse (the “fabliau” or “Conte a rire en vers”) held firmly to the belief in the “sanitary virtue” (“vertu saine”) of a burst of laughter. If Mr. It is only by drawing out those points to a certain distance that I get the idea of any lines at all; they must be drawn out to the same distance before they can be equal; and I can have no idea of their being equal without dividing that equal distance into two distinct parts or lines, both of which I must consider at the same time as contained with the same limits. A moderate number of persons have engaged in what is called “critical” writing, but no conclusion is any more solidly established than it was in 1865. The warrior offers his presents to the bride, paint for her eyes, fine woven stuff, scalps of enemies, collars, beautiful bracelets, rings for her feet, and swathing-bands for her first born. There has only been one Dante; and, after all, Dante had the benefit of years of practice in forms employed and altered by numbers of contemporaries and predecessors; he did not waste the years of youth in metric invention; and when he came to the _Commedia_ he knew how to pillage right and left. The name is compounded of the prefix, either feminine or diminutive, _x_; _balam_, or, as given by Guzman, _balan_;[159] and _queh_, deer. When Talma, in the part of ?dipus, after the discovery of his misfortune, slowly raises his hands and joins them together over his head in an attitude of despair, I conceive it is because in the extremity of his anguish, and in the full sense of his ghastly and desolate situation, he feels a want of something as a shield or covering to protect him from the weight that is ready to fall and crush him, and he makes use of that fine and impressive action for this purpose:—not that I suppose he is affected in this manner every time he repeats it, but he never would have thought of it but from having this deep and bewildering feeling of weight and oppression, which naturally suggested it to his imagination, and at the same time assured him that it was just. But when we regard the collection as a means of popularizing music and of improving popular musical taste, the matter takes on another aspect. Thou comest. In many American languages the hypothetical supposition expressed in the Latin subjunctive is indicated by the same circumlocution. ‘Whenever your Majesty’s father,’ said the old warrior and statesman, ‘did me the honour to consult me, he ordered the buffoons of the court to retire into the antechamber.’ It is from our disposition to admire, and consequently to imitate, the rich and the great, that they are enabled to set, or to lead, what is called a wonderful life the fashion. Though the doctrine of Demons, or being possessed, has been discarded; yet, in my opinion, it deserves a more serious consideration than medical men imagine:—it involves the true theory of mind and matter, their connection with each other, and the principles on which this connection depends, and by which it is regulated. We have too much of this in the library; attempts to form boys’ clubs with artificial aims and qualifications when clubs already formed to promote objects that are very real in the members’ minds are ignored or neglected; the provision of boresome talks on “Rubber-culture in Peru” and on “How I climbed Long’s Peak,” when members of the community would be genuinely interested in hearing an expert explain the income tax; the purchase of new books that nobody wants when an insistent demand for old standards of sterling worth has never been adequately met; all sorts of forcing from the outside instead of developing from the inside. There is a vast difference between the rigid abstractions of early modern comedy, before the art had extricated itself from the leading strings of the morality plays, and the relatively full and freely moving figures which we encounter in Moliere’s plays. _R._ I can answer for it, they do not wish to pull down Shakespear in order to set up Racine on the ruins of his reputation. Count Beugnot has published, as an appendix to the _Olim_, a collection known as the _Tout Lieu de St. In the most approved instrumental Music, accordingly, in the overtures of Handel and the concertos of Correlli, there is little or no imitation, and where there is any, it is the source of but a very small part of the merit of those compositions.

And so far this account is undoubtedly true, that we frequently have occasion to confirm our natural sense of the propriety and fitness of punishment, by reflecting how necessary it is for preserving the order of society. Valery’s “modern poet” who attempts “to produce in us a _state_.” A state, in itself, is nothing whatever. Several of the most eminent are at this moment Swedenborgians, animal magnetists, &c. But the man who felt himself the object of such deadly resentment from those whose favour he wished to gain, and whom he still wished to consider as his friends, had certainly lived too long for real glory; or for all the happiness which he could ever hope to enjoy in the love and esteem of his equals. M. At that great age, one should think, he might have had a little more patience. It has less of sexuality in it than the word last mentioned, and is a wonderful life applied by girls to each other, and as a term of family fondness. The French physiognomy is more cut up and subdivided into pretty lines and sharp angles than any other: it does not want for subtlety, or an air of gentility, which last it often has in a remarkable degree,—but it is the most unpoetical and the least picturesque of all others. Now let us go a little further. Their benefits can extend but to a few; but their fortunes interest almost every body. There the differences, the departure from “our way” and the inability to acquire this are great enough to appeal strongly to their crude sense of the ludicrous. Together they made up his world: literature, politics, riding to hounds. The empress, hurried away by a sudden and unconquerable passion for Amula, Count of Modena, in 996, repeated in all its details the story of Potiphar’s wife. But though the virtues of prudence, justice, and beneficence, may, upon different occasions, be recommended to us almost equally by two different principles; those of self-command are, upon most occasions, principally and almost entirely recommended to us by one; by the sense of propriety, by regard to the sentiments of the supposed impartial spectator. To all such mighty conquerors the great mob of mankind are naturally disposed to look up with a wondering, though, no doubt, with a very weak and foolish admiration. Self-deception may go far in matters of this kind, and there is something to be said in favor of hard and fast standardization without departure of any kind, in that it prevents aberrations such as I have just hinted at. The accuser was at liberty to select seven from among the participants of the brawl, and each of these was obliged to deny the crime with twelve conjurators. I can forgive the dirt and sweat of a gipsey under a hedge, when I consider that the earth is his mother, the sun is his father. When a theft is committed in a household, the servants are assembled, and a sorceress, or _vorogeia_, is sent for. Not only as a dramatist, but as a poet, he is superior to Maeterlinck, whose drama, in failing to be dramatic, fails also to be poetic. To take some actual cases, I find a library with four per cent of history and six per cent of literature on the shelves, whereas the corresponding circulation percentages are five and seven. When an institution reaches the conclusion that it is doing all that it can, or all that the community can properly ask of it, the chances are that it is losing its ability to concentrate. Those Romantick days are over, and there is not so much as a _Don Quixot_ of the Quill left to succour the distressed Damsels. While the Frenchman or the Englishman watches his roads or pavements day by day and never allows them to get out of repair, we build expensive roadways and leave them alone until they are in disgraceful condition–whereupon we tear them up and rebuild them. The same temple also furnished an illustration of ascertaining the divine will by means of the lot, for when a vacancy occurred in the priestship, and there were several applicants, the choice between them was determined by a reference to chance.[863] Even these traces of the ancient customs of the race disappear among the Latins, though they preserved in full force the habits of thought from which the ordeal took its rise. This trait appears most plainly in the pastimes of the young of many familiar species, including our two domestic pets, pastimes which are quite correctly described as animal play. 207), and the more general condemnation by Stephen V. This is one of the saddest varieties of “ill-luck”. Individual suggestibility, he considers, is conditioned by native disposition and character, and dependent upon the relative strengths of the two instincts of self-assertion and subjection. I have spoken here of the primitive unsophisticated smile as it may be observed in children and those adults who a wonderful life have not learned to control the primitive, and instinctive movements of the face. A chronic garrulity of laughter, typified in what Mr. The immediate appeal of Jonson is to the mind; his emotional tone is not in the single verse, but in the design of the whole. The height to which tides rise, and the violence and velocity of the currents, depend in a great measure on the actual configuration of the land, the contour of a long line of continental or insular coast, the depth and breadth of channels, the peculiar form at the bottom of the seas—in a word, on a combination of circumstances which are made to vary continually by many igneous and aqueous causes, and among the rest, by the tides and currents themselves. In less than six months, he was covered with ulcers, and a mass of disease. By this, a man accused of a charge resting on presumptions and incompletely proved, was required to clear himself with four compurgators of his own rank, who swore, as provided in the decretals of Innocent III., to their belief in his innocence.[262] CHAPTER VIII. Footnote 51: Just as a poet ought not to cheat us with lame metre and defective rhymes, which might be excusable in an improvisatori versifier. There seems too to be some natural connection between acuteness in tune and quickness in time or succession, as well as between gravity and slowness: an acute sound seems to fly off more quickly than a grave one: the treble is more cheerful than the bass; its notes likewise commonly succeed one another more rapidly. It may be added that the laughter of the laity at the clergy illustrates, in addition to the impulse already dealt with, the itching of spirited mortals to turn on oppressors. It has infinite varieties, which the artist is obliged to notice and to reconcile, or he will make strange work. ‘The dregs of life,’ therefore, contain very little of force or spirit which ——‘the first spritely runnings could not give.’ Imagination is, in this sense, sometimes truer than reality; for our passions being ‘compacted of imagination,’ and our desires whetted by impatience and delay, often lose some of their taste and essence with possession. I have often seen him, escaped from the noisy repulsive scene, sunning himself in the adjoining walks of St. Our passions of a grosser kind wear out before our senses: but in ordinary cases they grow indolent and conform to habit, instead of becoming impatient and inordinate from a desire of change, as we are satisfied with more moderate bodily exercise in age or middle life than we are in youth.—Upon the whole, there are many things to prop up and reinforce our fondness for existence, after the intoxication of our first acquaintance with it is over; health, a walk and the appetite it creates, a book, the doing a good-natured or friendly action, are satisfactions that hold out to the last; and with these, and any others to aid us that fall harmlessly in our way, we may make a shift for a few seasons, after having exhausted the short-lived transports of an eager and enthusiastic imagination, and without being under the necessity of hanging or drowning ourselves as soon as we come to years of discretion. The public library can do no more helpful thing to our modern life than to assist the public to understand and love it. It is an ancient error—which, however, I find repeated in the official “Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages,” issued by our Bureau of Ethnology—that the primitive condition of languages is one “where few ideas are expressed by few words.” On the contrary, languages structurally at the bottom of the scale have an enormous and useless excess of words. If, then, we must be very careful in applying terms of censure, like “diffuse,” we must be equally careful of praise.